Elite Muay Thai & Kickboxing

Elite MTIA Muay Thai

Muay Thai is pronounced [mūa̯j tʰāj] or Thai boxing is a combat sport from Thailand that uses stand-up striking along with various clinching techniques This physical and mental discipline which includes combat on shins is known as “the art of eight limbs” because it is characterized by the combined use of fists, elbows, knees, shins, being associated with a good physical preparation that makes a full-contact fighter very efficient. Muay Thai became widespread internationally in the twentieth century, when practitioners defeated notable practitioners of other martial arts. The professional league is governed by The Professional Boxing Association of Thailand (P.A.T) sanctioned by The Sport Authority of Thailand (S.A.T.), and World Muaythai Federation (WMF) overseas.

In Australia the main body is Muay Thai Australia which has become known as the MTA.  The MTA also works very closely with IFMA Australia which has now been recognized by the IOC.

Elite Muay Thai owes its lineage back to Master Toddy, who introduced Muay Thai to the UK in the early 70’s.  Jeff Bullock was one of Master Toddy’s students at that time, and still is only recently completing his Ajarn Master of Muay Thai Course.

 

Punching (Chok)

English Thai Romanization IPA
Jab หมัดหน้า/หมัดแย็บ Mat na/Mat yaep  [màt nâ]
Cross หมัดตรง Mat trong  [màt troŋ]
Hook หมัดเหวี่ยงสั้น Mat wiang san  [màt wìəŋ sân]
Overhand (boxing) หมัดเหวี่ยงยาว Mat wiang yao  [màt wìəŋ jaːw]
Spinning Backfist หมัดเหวี่ยงกลับ Mat wiang klap  [màt wìəŋ klàp]
Uppercut หมัดเสย/หมัดสอยดาว Mat soei/Mat soi dao  [màt sɤ̌j],  [màt sɔ̌j daːw]
Superman punch กระโดดชก Kradot chok  [kradòːt tɕʰók]

 

Elbow (Sok)

English Thai Romanization IPA
Elbow Slash ศอกตี (ศอกสับ) Sok ti  [sɔ̀ːk tiː]
Horizontal Elbow ศอกตัด Sok tat  [sɔ̀ːk tàt]
Uppercut Elbow ศอกงัด Sok ngat  [sɔ̀ːk ŋát]
Forward Elbow Thrust ศอกพุ่ง Sok phung  [sɔ̀ːk pʰûŋ]
Reverse Horizontal Elbow ศอกเหวี่ยงกลับ (ศอกกระทุ้ง) Sok wiang klap  [sɔ̀ːk wìəŋ klàp]
Spinning Elbow ศอกกลับ Sok klap  [sɔ̀ːk klàp]
Double Elbow Chop ศอกกลับคู่ Sok klap khu  [sɔ̀ːk klàp kʰûː]
Mid-Air Elbow Strike กระโดดศอก Kradot sok  [kradòːt sɔ̀ːk]

 

Kicking (Teh)

Muay Thai boxer delivering a kick

English Thai Romanization IPA
Straight Kick เตะตรง Teh troeng  [tèʔ troŋ]
Roundhouse Kick เตะตัด Teh tat  [tèʔ tàt]
Diagonal Kick เตะเฉียง Teh chiang  [tèʔ tɕʰǐəŋ]
Half-Shin, Half-Knee Kick เตะครึ่งแข้งครึ่งเข่า Teh khrueng khang khrueng khao  [tèʔ kʰrɯ̂ŋ kʰɛ̂ŋ kʰrɯ̂ŋ kʰàw]
Reverse Roundhouse Kick เตะกลับหลัง Teh glap hlang  [tèʔ klàp lǎŋ]
Down Roundhouse Kick เตะกด Teh gote  [tèʔ kòt]
Axe Heel Kick เตะเข่า Teh khao  [tèʔ kʰàw]
Jump Kick กระโดดเตะ Gradode teh  [kradòːt tèʔ]
Step-Up Kick เขยิบเตะ Khayoep teh  [kʰa.jɤ̀p tèʔ]

Knee (Ti Khao)

English Thai Romanization IPA
Straight Knee Strike เข่าตรง Khao trong  [kʰàw troŋ]
Diagonal Knee Strike เข่าเฉียง Khao chiang  [kʰàw tɕʰǐəŋ]
Curving Knee Strike เข่าโค้ง Khao khong  [kʰàw kʰóːŋ]
Horizontal Knee Strike เข่าตัด Khao tat  [kʰàw tàt]
Knee Slap เข่าตบ Khao top  [kʰàw tòp]
Knee Bomb เข่ายาว Khao yao  [kʰàw jaːw]
Flying Knee เข่าลอย Khao loi  [kʰàw lɔːj]
Step-Up Knee Strike เข่าเหยียบ Khao yiap  [kʰàw jìəp]

 

Liam Badger

Liam Badger is probably Elite Australia’s best known Muay Thai Boxer.

 

Elite Kickboxing

Elite Kickboxing is based on a  group of stand-up combat sports based on kicking and punching, historically developed from Karate and mixed with boxing. Kickboxing is practiced for self-defense, general fitness, recreation, fun, or as an exciting contact sport.

Japanese kickboxing originated in the 1960s, with competitions held since then.  Historically, kickboxing can be considered a hybrid martial art formed from the combination of elements of various traditional styles. This approach became increasingly popular since the 1970s, and since the 1990s, kickboxing has contributed to the emergence of mixed martial arts.

There is no single international governing body. Consequently, there is no single kickboxing World Championship, (just like boxing ) and champion titles are issued by individual promotors, such as:-

K1, Glory, Balitor, Kulunand SUPERKOMBAT among others. Bouts organized under different governing bodies apply different rules, such as allowing the use of knees or clinching, etc.

 

Terminology

An Elite Post – Kickboxing workout Picture, and a how was it for you chat?

The term “kickboxing” can be used in a narrow and in a wide sense.

  • The narrow use is restricted to the styles that self-identify as kickboxing, i.e. Japanese kickboxing (with its spin-off styles or rules such as K-1), Dutch kickboxing, and American kickboxing.
  • In the wider sense, it includes all stand-up combat sports that allow both punching and kicking, including Muay Thai, Savate, and certain styles of karate (especially full-contact Knockdown Karate, Kudo & Combudo).

The term kickboxing (キックボクシング) itself was introduced in the 1960s as a Japenese Anglicism, by Japanese boxing promoter Osamu Noguchi for a hybrid martial art combining Muay Thai and karate which he had introduced in 1958. The term was later also adopted by the American variant. Since there has been a lot of cross-fertilization between these styles, with many practitioners training or competing under the rules of more than one style, the history of the individual styles cannot be seen in isolation from one another.

Modern Kickboxing as a Sport

Main article: List of kickboxing organizations 

 

Kickboxing promotions

Some of the top kickboxing promotions in the world are:

  • ISKA (Sports Karate)
  • ISKA Ring Sports and the largest active professional Group
  • (ISKA) Glory
  • K1
  • Kulun – Fight Series
  • IFMA
  • WAKO

Amateur Rule Sets

Semi-Contact

Semi-contact rules or Points Fighting, is the variant of American kickboxing most similar to karate, since it consists in fighting for the purpose of scoring points with an emphasis on delivery, speed, and technique. Under such rules, fights are held on the tatami, presenting the belts to classify the fighters in order of experience and ability. The male kickboxers wear shirts and kickboxing trousers as well as protective gear including: mouth-guard, hand-wraps, an approved point fighting gloves, groin-guard, shin-pads, kick-boots, and headgear. The female kickboxers will wear a sports bra and chest protection in addition to the male clothing/protective gear.

Notable fighters under semi-contact rules include Alfie Lewis and Raymond Daniels.

Rules:

  • Fighters can score through punches or kicks, striking above the waist and foot sweeps, executed below the ankle.
  • Punches, kicks, and foot sweeps are awarded 1 point. Kicks to the head or jumping kicks to the body are awarded 2 points. Jumping kicks to the head are awarded 3 points.
  • Hook kicks and Axe kicks are allowed but must be executed with the sole of the foot.
  • The use of the shins is seldom allowed, save for jumping, body and spinning kicking techniques.
  • Elbows, knees and spinning backfists are prohibited.
  • Clinch fighting throws and sweeps (with the exception of foot sweeps) are forbidden.
  • Bouts are usually 1-3 rounds (lasting 2–3 minutes each) with a 1-minute rest in between rounds.

Light Continuous

Light continuous rules are a light contact variant of American kickboxing, with an emphasis on delivery, speed, technique and it is designed to pave and prepare a pathway for competitors to work towards ring fighting. Under such rules, contests are held on the tatami, presenting the belts to classify the fighters in order of experience and ability. The male kickboxers wear shirts and kickboxing trousers as well as protective gear including: mouth-guard, hand-wraps, 10 oz (280 g). boxing gloves, groin-guard, shin-pads, kick-boots, and headgear. The female kickboxers will wear a sports bra and chest protection in addition to the male clothing/protective gear.

Rules:

  • Fighters can score through continuous action of punches or kicks, striking above the waist and footsweeps, executed below the ankle.
  • Punches, kicks, and foot sweeps are awarded 1 point. Kicks to the head or jumping kicks to the body are awarded 2 points. Jumping kicks to the head are awarded 3 points.
  • Hook kicks and Axe kicks are allowed but must be executed with the sole of the foot.
  • The use of the shins is seldom allowed, (except for body kicks).
  • Elbows, Knees, and spinning backfists are prhibited.
  • Clinch fighting throws and sweeps (with the exception of foot sweeps) are forbidden.
  • Bouts are usually 1-3 rounds (lasting 2–3 minutes each) with a 1-minute rest in between rounds.

Light- Kick & K1 Light Kick

Light- Kick rules & K1 Light – Kick are a light contact variant of Low-Kick kickboxing & K1, with an emphasis on delivery, speed, technique and it is designed to pave and prepare a pathway for competitors to work towards ring fighting. Under such rules, contests are held on the tatami, presenting the belts to classify the fighters in order of experience and ability. The male kickboxers wear shirts and kickboxing shorts as well as protective gear including: mouth-guard, hand-wraps, 10 oz (280 g). boxing gloves, groin-guard, shin-pads, and headgear. The female kickboxers will wear a sports bra and chest protection in addition to the male clothing/protective gear.

Rules:

  • Fighters can score through continuous action of punches or kicks, striking above and below the waist, (but not the groin or knee area) and foot sweeps, executed below the ankle.
  • Punches, kicks to the leg/body, and foot sweeps are awarded 1 point. Kicks to the head or jumping kicks to the body are awarded 2 points. Jumping kicks to the head are awarded 3 points.
  • Hook kicks and Axe kicks are allowed but must be executed with the sole of the foot.
  • The use of the shins is allowed.
  • Elbows and spinning backfists are forbidden. Knees to the body are allowed in the K1 variant.
  • Clinch fighting, throws and sweeps (with the exception of foot sweeps) are forbidden.

 

K1 Kickboxing

K-1 began in 1993 and is a kickboxing platform and martial arts brand well-known worldwide mainly for its heavyweight division fights.[1] In January 2012, K-1 Global Holdings Limited, a company registered in Hong Kong, acquired the rights to K-1, and is the current organizer of K-1 events worldwide.

K-1 Grand Prix

Original K-1 Grand Prix was a single event tournament held in Japan where competitors participated on invitation. By 1998, K-1 introduced the K-1 World Grand Prix format composed of K-1 Regional Elimination Tournaments (theoretically amounting to six), which qualify fighters for the K-1 World Grand Prix Final, along with licensed K-1 Fighting Network events designed to hold national preliminaries for regional qualification. However, given the fact that K-1’s popularity differs greatly among six K-1 regions, which may limit the number of actual elimination tournaments or change locations. For example, K-1 attempted to gain popularity in the United States by holding two GPs, however only a few Americans have ever qualified for the Finals. In 2006 one of the American GPs was relocated to Auckland. Additionally the K-1 Paris GP lost its qualifying right in favor of Amsterdam. Eventually Amsterdam lost it in favor of Łódź, and then Łódź in favor of Bucharest.

K-1 World Grand Prix Final Eliminator (“Final 16”) is an event where 16 participants compete for the final eight spots in the Final (“Final 8”). Eight participants from the Final Eliminator meet at the K-1 World Grand Prix Final that was traditionally held at Tokyo Dome. Lesser elements in the tournament format have been significantly modified in years. The 2012 final took place for the first time in history outside Japan, in Zagreb, Croatia.

K-1 World MAX and other

By 2002, K-1 started the K-1 World MAX (“Middleweight Artistic Xtreme”) tournament for 70 kg (154 lb) Middleweight division, following a similar scheme to K-1 World Grand Prix (with theoretically four regional eliminators). In 2007, K-1 introduced two new title belts separate from K-1 World GP Champions, Super Heavyweight World Title for fighters over 100 kg/220 lbs and Heavyweight World Title for fighters under 100 kg/156–220 lbs.

Rules:

  • Each match is three or five rounds in duration, with each round lasting three minutes.
  • The match can end by Knockout, Technical Knockout, Decision, Disqualification, Draw or No Contest.
  • Both the referee and the ring doctor have full authority to stop the fight.
  • The fight is scored by three judges on a ten-point must system (The winner of each round receives ten points, and the loser receives nine or less. If the round is even, both competitors receive ten points).
  • If there is a draw after three rounds, the judges’ scores are thrown out and one or two extra three-minute rounds are contested. The judges’ decision will then come from the scoring of each extra round only. If, after the extra round(s), there is still a draw, the judges will decide a winner based on the flow of the entire match, considering even the slightest difference. A fight can only end in a draw if both fighters go down at the same time and cannot get up, or in the case of accidental injury in the late stages of the contest.
  • Three knockdowns in a round ends the contest, declared a technical knockout.
  • The mandatory eight count is in effect (regardless when the fallen fighter rises, the referee must count to at least “eight” on all knockdowns).
  • The standing eight count is in effect (the referee has the right to declare a knockdown on a fighter who appears to be in a dangerous condition to continue in the match).
  • A fighter can be saved by the bell only in the last round.

In K-1 single elimination tournament matches:

Each match is three rounds in duration.

Except in the final, two knockdowns in a round ends the contest, declared a technical knockout.

One or two reserve fights are held prior to the single elimination matches. If for any reason a fighter who wins and advances through the brackets is unable to continue, a reserve match competitor, or the fighter’s opponent from the most recent match, takes his place. There are certain exceptions to this rule (i.e. a fighter who lost a match by knockout might not be eligible to replace another fighter).

 

Fouls

The following actions in K-1 are considered fouls:

  • Using the head or elbow to deliver a blow
  • Attacking the opponent in the groin
  • Delivering wrestling or judo throwing or submission techniques
  • Thumbing, choking or biting the opponent
  • Punching the opponent in the throat
  • Attacking the opponent while he is down or in the process of getting up
  • Attacking the opponent after the referee calls a break
  • Holding the ropes
  • Using offensive language to the referee
  • Attacking the back of the head with a punch
  • Attempting to cause the opponent to fall out of the ring
  • Voluntarily exiting the ring during the course of a match
  • Attacking an opponent who turns around and shows his back (if the opponent loses his will to fight)
  • Delivering a backspin blow in an unauthorized area
  • Charging inside the opponent’s arms with the head held low (inducing a head-butt)
  • Fighting in a passive manner (without attacking), including continuous holding and clinching
  • Attacking more than once while holding the opponent’s kicking leg, or while holding the opponent’s neck with both hands.

A fighter is penalized as follows:

Caution – verbal reprimand by the referee

Warning – fighter is shown a yellow card

Point Deduction – fighter is shown a red card

Two cautions result in one warning. Two warnings result in a point deduction, and three point deductions in one round can result in a disqualification.

A red card is shown automatically if a fighter commits a foul with malicious intent.

 

International Kickboxing Rules also known as Oriental or Modified Thai.

International rules, or freestyle rules (also known simply as Kickboxing) is sometimes described as when Kickboxing meets Muay Thai.  The male kickboxers are bare-chested wearing kickboxing shorts and protective gear including: mouth-guard, hand-wraps, shin-wraps, 10 oz (280 g). boxing gloves and groin-guard. The female kickboxers will wear a sports bra and chest protection in addition to the male clothing/protective gear.

  • Fighters are allowed to strike their opponent with punches and kicks, including kicks below the waist, except for the groin.
  • Elbows are forbidden.
  • Clinch fightingthrows and sweeps are allowed but limited depending on the sanctioning body.
  • Bouts are 3 to 5 x 3 min rounds for A & Elite Class Fighters and 3 to 5×2 minutes for B Class. C & Novice Class fighters contest over 3 x 90 secs or 3 x2 mins depending on age and physical ability. Each round has a 1-minute rest in between rounds.

 

Muay Thai

Muay Thai, or Thai boxing, rules usually sees bouts contested over 5, 3-minute rounds and male fighters bare-chested wearing shorts and protective gear including: mouth-guard, hand-wraps, shin-wraps, 10 oz (280 g). boxing gloves, groin-guard and sometimes prajioudarm bands. The female Thai boxers will wear a sports bra and chest protection in addition to the male clothing/protective gear. Muay Thai is unique in that it is the only style of kickboxing that allows elbows, knees, clinch fighting, , throws, sweeps and low kicks. strikes were allowed until the 1980s in international Muay Thai and are still permitted in Thailand itself (though the boxers wear cups to lessen the impact). Kicking to mid-body and head are scored highly generating a large number of points on judges’ scorecards. Moreover, kicking is still judged highly even if the kick was blocked. In contrast, punching is worth fewer points.

Rules:

  • Fighters are allowed to strike their opponent with punches, kicks, including kicks below the waist, elbows and knees.
  • Clinch fighting, throws and sweeps are allowed.
  • Bouts are generally 5, 3-minute rounds with 2 minutes rest in between, but 3 round fights and 1 min are also used. B Class can contest over 3-5×2 min rounds.  C & Novice Class fighters contest over 3 x 90 secs or 3 x2 mins depending on age and physical ability.  Each round has a 1-minute rest in between rounds.